April 30

Our Friends and Our Feelings Online

An OJCS Library Workshop for Grades 4-8

This workshop has been offered to teachers both as a Nearpod lesson and in the following video format.

This workshop focuses on ways to keep our online friendships healthy and happy.  It also focuses on ways to deal with negative emotions that may come up, like jealousy.

April 14

Keeping Online Gaming Safe and Kind

Here is a workshop that can be used from grade 1 to grade 4.  We will talk about some of the most important ways we can stay safe and kind online while gaming.

  • Protecting our game passwords
  • Not sharing personal information in game chats
  • Being kind in game chats
  • Not being overly competitive
  • Finding our media balance
  • And remembering to be a great digital citizen

Here is a link to just the slides!

January 21

Let’s Think About Our Digital Footprints

A New Nearpod Lesson

I have created a new Nearpod lesson that can be used anywhere from grade 4 to grade 8 in which we will learn about Digital Footprints.  Digital Footprints are the tracks you leave all over the internet every time you go online.  Any time you visit a website, leave a comment, post a picture, create a post on social media, post a video on youtube, participate in online chats, etc… you are leaving behind a digital footprint.  It is extremely important to be aware of this because these footprints are permanent and searchable.  In this Nearpod lesson you will participate in polls, quizzes, and a game of ‘Time to Climb’ to learn about this topic.

If you aren’t a Nearpod user, here is more on the topic of Digital Footprints;

Let’s watch this little video about Digital Footprints created by Common Sense Education.

It may seem impossible to believe but 15 years from now a future employer may be Googling your name and finding the mean comments you left all over YouTube, or the crazy photos you posted on social media, and thinking you may not be the best person to hire for a job!  More importantly for today though, the things you are posting now will find their way back to parents and teachers.  Here are some tips from safesitter.org to making sure that the tracks we leave online are the good kind!

So let’s think about some places online we need to be extra careful…

Game Chats

  • Never share private information like your address, full name, school, phone number, or email in a game chat.
  • Don’t make rude or mean comments in a game chat.  Not only will it get you banned from the game, it will be permanently logged.

YouTube, TikTok, and Social Media Comments

  • The comments you post online should be supportive and kind.  Hurtful comments can never be erased, even if you delete the post.  It is very easy for others to screenshot and share the things you’ve posted.

The Sites You Visit

  • Make sure you are visiting sites that are appropriate and approved by parents and teachers.  Every site you visit shows up in your Search History and can be seen by parents and school administrators.

Your Messenger Chats

  • Most parent-approved texting apps like Messenger Kids allow parents to see every chat.  Other chat apps allow friends and family to screenshot and save messages.  So be aware of the kinds of photos and messages you are texting with others.  What you say today may be online forever.

Your Social Media and Blog Posts

  • Make sure that all of the videos, photos and posts you put online are ones you’d be happy to share forevermore, because that is how long they will be searchable online!
  • Never post pictures of your friends without their permission.
  • Make sure you have parental permission to be posting certain kinds of posts on the internet.

January 13

Online Safety Workshop – Protect Your Passwords!

You might have heard that there are some very commonly used passwords that you should never use because they are very easy for hackers to figure out.  Passwords we should never use include;

  • your pet’s name
  • your own name
  • your siblings name
  • your birthday
  • your street name
  • password
  • 123456
  • abc123
  • iloveyou
  • princess
  • dragon

But how do we create a strong password and keep them safe?  This video slideshow will help you learn some easy tricks to creating and protecting your passwords.

Activity

We are going to learn how to create a super strong password by playing the game Password Protect on the Common Sense Education website.  Remember, when you are finished, don’t share your super strong password with anyone except for your parents or teachers!

January 5

Digital Citizenship Workshop – Facts vs. Opinions

Today we listen to the story;

Facts vs. Opinions vs. Robots by Michael Rex

Afterwards we will complete a short assignment to make sure we understand the difference.  Understanding the difference between facts and opinions is another way we can be great digital citizens.  There is so much information online presented as a fact when it is actually just an opinion.  And in this book we learn how important it is to listen respectfully to the opinions of others even if we don’t agree with them.  This is especially true online when we make comments on each other’s blogs and social media.

 

November 30

Digital Citizenship Meets The OJCS Reading Challenge!

This year the OJCS Reading Challenge is designed to make reading fun, encourage our students to reach for new reading goals, and to teach digital citizenship while connecting globally.

We will be getting students to participate in the class creation of tweets, instagram posts, youtube videos or tik tok videos (whatever social media formats the teacher prefers, the accounts are owned and regulated by the teacher and are professional (not personal) accounts).  These posts will share their class reading goals and accomplishments in fun and creative ways.  The class will then check those posts regularly for likes and words of encouragement from around the globe.  They may even be able to  connect with other schools participating in their own reading challenge.  Students will also use their blogs as a place to post book reviews and to blog about their personal reading goals.  They can even embed or link the class social media posts directly to their blogs!

Class goals could include a certain number of books read by the class each week or each month, a certain number of books of a specific genre or a variety of genres read, etc…  These goals are determined by the teacher or decided as a class and can change week to week or month to month.

Students love being online, so this is a way for them to practice their digital citizenship with post creation (spelling, hashtags, using photos and videos in posts) and take pride in their reading accomplishments, as well as get global props and encouragement.
The end-of-year prize is a classroom movie party for each class that participated regularly.  The library will provide popcorn and candy for each class.
October 15

Let’s Get Unplugged

Lower Grades Digital Citizenship

First, let’s read Unplugged by Steve Antony

So how do you use your time?

Everyone is going to get a sheet of paper and on one side you are going to write down all of the things you do plugged in (online) and on the other side, all of the things you do unplugged (offline.)  It will look a little something like this…

Once you have finished, I want you to fold this piece of paper in half.

What would your lives look like if you only got to do the things on one side of the paper?

Living our lives mainly online…

  • Let’s start with the plugged side.  If we spent our entire day online and did little else, how would we feel?  Discuss with your class NOW!  
  • After the discussion… 7 hours of Roblox or YouTube might sound great, but in reality, making media choices like this can lead us to feel tired, frustrated, headachy, and sick!

Living our lives completely offline…

  • Now what if we only had the unplugged side?  Would we be completely happy?  Is there anything we would miss?  Discuss with your class NOW!
  • After the discussion… It is okay to enjoy being online!  We get to chat on Facetime, play awesome games, and watch fun videos.

Let’s Aim for Media Balance

Media Balance is making sure that the time we spend online allows lots of room for the other awesome things in life.  This makes us all feel healthier and happier.

Being Unplugged means more time for colouring!  Here is a cute colouring page!

May 25

Cyberbullying – Being Mean Online

Lower Grades Digital Citizenship Lesson for the week of June 1st

When friends or classmates are mean at school, we know what that looks like…

  • making fun of how you look or what you wear
  • not letting you play with them
  • spreading rumours or lies about you that aren’t true
  • sharing personal information about you (gossip) to hurt your feelings or embarass you
  • insult you for how good or not good you are at something

We also know how bad that kind of meanness makes us feel…

 

Even though the internet can be a super fun place to spend our time, the same kind of meanness and bullying can happen when we are there too.  CYBERBULLYING is what you call bullying or meanness that is online.

The way it looks online is…

  • being mean to other players in a video game
  • posting rude comments on other people’s  webpages, photos, or videos
  • posting and sharing embarrassing or mean photos of someone online
  • excluding someone from participating online

These things make us feel just like we did with real life bullying…

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes people are meaner online than in real life, because if you were with the person in real life, they would be able to see how bad you felt about their behaviour.  Online they aren’t seeing how you are reacting to what you they are saying (example crying), and that makes people think less about the impact of what they are doing.

Here is a short video that shows an example of cyberbullying and what you can do about it.

In the video the girl talks to her parents who talks to her teachers and they put an end to the cyberbullying.  It is really important to tell a trusted adult about cyberbullying if it is happening to you.  They can help you to figure out what to do about it and how to stop it.

Another way to be a great digital citizen online is to stand up to cyberbullying when you see it happening to someone else.  This is called being an UPSTANDER.   Tell your friend who is being bullied how great you think they are.  Tell the bully that mean comments are unwelcome.  Or tell a trusted adult about your friend being bullied.

And finally, there are buttons on websites that say BLOCK and REPORT ABUSE.

    • BLOCK means that you have the ability to block somebody from being able to see or comment on your account.
    • REPORT ABUSE is a way to tell the website or game owner that someone is misbehaving on the site.

Never use these buttons as a joke because they are permanent and can’t be undone.

Now you know how you can stand up to cyberbullying and be a great digital citizen.

YOUR ASSIGNMENT:

In the comments on this page, write about a time that you experienced cyberbullying or saw it happen to someone else.  If you haven’t seen examples of this, write about one thing you will do if it happens to you or to a friend.

 

May 20

Charli and Dixie talk about Cyberbullying

Charli D’Amelio needs no introduction and in this video she talks about a huge issue of concern to everyone, cyberbullying.  We are online more now than ever.  And with new social media apps and games, comes more and more opportunity to comment on strangers videos and posts and even send them DMs.  Opening up our ability to communicate with new people around the world brings with it a lot of responsibility.  The types of comments we are posting online say much more about us than they do about the person we are commenting on.  

Cyberbullying can take many forms.  A few of them are;

  • Trolling – The kind of bullying Charli and Dixie talk about in the video is getting hateful comments.  This is called trolling.  Trolls often target the same people over and over.  It is important to report and block trolls when you notice them becoming a problem.
  • Masquerading – Someone sets up a fake profile just so that they can bully others anonymously.  This is an extremely cowardly kind of bullying that makes the bully harder to catch and report.
  • Outing or doxing – sharing private or personal information about someone else without that person’s permission and usually to cause humiliation and shame.  This can include information about or private photos and videos of that person.
  • Exclusion – leaving a person out of online groups or hangouts, or intentionally posting comments or photos in which a friend is excluded.  This can seem like a passive form of bullying but has serious consequences on self-esteem.
  • Dissing – Everyone now knows about the popularity of diss tracks.  But by supporting diss tracks and other forms of dissing, you are supporting bullying and spreading hate.  Dissing is an attempt to ruin another person’s reputation and is often founded on false information or deliberate lies about a person.

Cyberbullying is a difficult and mostly unavoidable aspect of living a good part of our lives online.  Building resilience (or a thick skin) is one way of coping with this problem.  Knowing that it isn’t about YOU, it is about the person trying to hurt you.  They can be feeling jealous, they may have a bad home life, they may be trying to win followers through meanness, they might be insecure.  It is not that there is something wrong with you personally.  And always talk about this issue with a trusted relative or teacher if things are bad.  They can help you figure out some next steps.

Watch this video and post in the comments if you’ve used any of these ways to stop a cyberbully before.